Buddhist English

Encountering translations of Tibetan Buddhist texts is to enter a realm of technical terms embedded in an ethos that has few resonances with the beliefs and concepts that we are familiar with in the Greek and Judaeo-Christian traditions. Translators attempting to make traditional Tibetan Buddhist texts available are faced with a complex task. Texts written into Tibetan have arisen in […]

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Saraha. Treasury of songs.

Although Saraha had a scholar’s training his style here is to offer a simple sharing of his experience. He presents the ground: the simplicity of the base and source of experience. Then the path: the way to not stray from the ground. And finally the result: abiding at ease in the ground without reification or attachment. There is no discussion or debate for this is not a proposition but a revelation.

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Tulku Tsultrim Zangpo (Tulku Tsulo). The Lamp Clarifying Meditation

The lamp clarifying the essentials of the way of meditation This short text was written by Tulku Tsultrim Zangpo, also known as Tulku Tsulo or Tulku Tshulo. He was the main teacher of CR Lama. The Tibetan can be read here. The English text is included in Finding Freedom: Texts from the Theravadin, Mahayana and Dzogchen Buddhist traditions by James Low,  […]

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Ayu Khandro’s heart-felt advice

“The Record of the Heart-felt Advice of the Dakini, Indestructible Glorious Lamp” translated from the Tibetan into various languages James has taught on this text by the Tibetan yogini, Ayu Khandro (also spelled Ayo Khandro),  in various countries at various times (see below). Read the Tibetan textRead the text in English. The English text is included in Finding Freedom: Texts from […]

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The Mirror of luminous revelation. Aracena, 2016

This text comes from Nuden Dorje, the first incarnation of my own teacher, C R Lama. We believe that Nuden Dorje was himself an incarnation of one of the close disciples of Padmasambhava, and that Padmasambhava came directly from the pure heart of Amitabha.
Buddhist texts often include a history of how the text arose, from whom, where and when. To say that a text came directly from Padmasambhava or from the mind of another great teacher, what does this mean? Why should we trust it? Who should we trust? You come here and I am telling you a lot of things. Why should you trust me? If you trust there is a chance you will be cheated, but if you don’t trust it’s difficult to proceed.

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