Keep it simple: dzogchen in daily life. Brighton, May 2007

Because our life is nothing but moments, events, arising and passing, arising and passing. All that we’ve ever done is gone. Our childhood is gone. We can remember it, we can tell stories about it, but it’s gone. Even our breakfast is gone. Everything is gone. If we really see that, then when we tell people about ourselves, about our past, we’re just inviting them to fall asleep with us. We’re saying, ‘I had a lovely dream, let me share it with you. You can fall asleep in my dream for a while and then, because I believe in reciprocity, I’ll fall asleep in yours.’

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Equanimity and the pull of the five poisons. Public Talk. Frankfurt, 2019

Buddhist teaching day. Equanimity and the pull of the five poisons: the power of the five poisonous afflictions (mental dullness, desire, aversion, jealousy and pride) is very strong and each affliction can easily pull us away from grounded harmony and into the treacherous security of taking up a position. However equanimity is the great quality of the Middle Way avoiding extremes. Poised, dynamically balancing according to circumstances yet without bias in any direction, it reveals the freedom not to be at the mercy of the afflictions.

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The Heart of Dzogchen. Eifel, Oct 2012

“What does it mean for me to be me? What is our real identity? Is our identity just what we take it to be – the narratives that we say about ourself – or is identity perhaps something different?

From the point of view of dzogchen, there are many ways to see the constructed way in which we create fantasies of identity about who we are. We may occupy them for some time, but then it becomes impossible to occupy them any more because the present becomes the past.

The present is always becoming the past, so what shall we rely on? This is the central question in dzogchen because if we rely on something unreliable we feel betrayed and we do not feel supported.”

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Equanimity and the pull of the five poisons. Frankfurt, 2019

Buddhist teaching day. Equanimity and the pull of the five poisons: the power of the five poisonous afflictions (mental dullness, desire, aversion, jealousy and pride) is very strong and each affliction can easily pull us away from grounded harmony and into the treacherous security of taking up a position. However equanimity is the great quality of the Middle Way avoiding extremes. Poised, dynamically balancing according to circumstances yet without bias in any direction, it reveals the freedom not to be at the mercy of the afflictions.

» Read more
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